Connect with us

Money

Ukraine Says It Captured Pro-Russia Politician Medvedchuk – Forbes

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky and the Security Service of Ukraine released images Tuesday of Ukrainian politician and oligarch Viktor Medvedchuk in handcuffs, claiming they’d captured the supporter of Russian President Vladimir Putin weeks after he allegedly escaped from house arrest following Russia’s invasion.

Fugitive oligarch and Russian President Vladimir Putin’s close friend Viktor Medvedchuk sits in a … [+] chair with his hands cuffed after a special operation was carried out by Security Service of Ukraine in Ukraine on April 12, 2022. (Photo by UKRAINIAN PRESIDENCY/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

The Ukrainian Security Service tweeted images of Medvedchuk in handcuffs and a military uniform, claiming Ukrainian operatives had “conducted a lightning-fast and dangerous multi-level special operation” to arrest him, according to a translation from Reuters.
Ukraine claimed Medvedchuk was wearing the Ukrainian military uniform “for camouflage” and had been “hiding from justice lately.”

In February, Ukrainian officials said Medvedchuk—a member of Ukraine’s parliament and a former leader of the pro-Russia For Life political party—had escaped his house arrest days after Russia invaded Ukraine, though his representatives denied this report, according to Reuters.

Medvedchuk was initially placed on house arrest in May 2021 after Ukraine accused him of treason. The politician is one of Russia’s most prominent allies in Ukraine, and he’s been a close friend of Putin for decades: Putin is godfather to Medvedchuk’s daughter, according to the Washington Post. Following Russia’s annexation of Crimea in 2014, Ukraine began sanctioning the oligarch. Zelensky froze Medvedchuk’s assets in 2021, claiming he’d been financing acts of terrorism.

For Life was one of 11 parties Zelensky suspended last month over alleged connections to Russia. Following Medvedchuk’s alleged escape from house arrest, the party removed him from leadership and condemned Russia’s invasion.

$620 million. That was Medvedchuk’s approximate net worth in 2021, Forbes Ukraine estimated. As of last year, Medvedchuk owned three Ukrainian television stations that Zelensky blocked as part of his attempt to freeze the oligarch’s assets in February 2021, claiming the channels were spreading propaganda. Zelensky’s spokesperson Iuliia Mendel said Ukraine blocked the channels because they were being used as “one of the instruments of war against Ukraine,” and claimed the stations were financed by Russia, according to ABC News. It is unclear whether Medvedchuk still owns the stations.

Last year, the U.S. government claimed Medvedchuk was an option to replace Zelensky as a pro-Russia figurehead if the country orchestrated a coup in Ukraine.
Last year, the U.S. government claimed Medvedchuk was an option to replace Zelensky as a pro-Russia figurehead if the country orchestrated a coup in Ukraine.
Medvedchuk’s capture has not been independently verified.

source

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Money

A 12-Week Money Course Helped Me Raise My Net Worth

“I am here. I am capable. I am wealthy.”
So goes the benediction at the start of every Factora Wealth Circle meeting, held over Zoom since the pandemic but headquartered in Austin. Factora, a women-led company that teaches personal finance in a tangible way, hosts Wealth Circle, a live, online course and community, for 12 weeks, twice a year. Sessions meet every other week on Wednesday nights, with homework in between.

I decided to attend earlier this year after a fellow writer from grad school tipped me off to the program. Now, a month out from my “graduation,” my net worth has increased 29% from when I enrolled.

I sit with my camera on, mic muted, amongst hundreds of other women. Our expressions range from fascination to exhaustion to epiphany. That’s just how it goes when personal finance is the topic du jour.

Our host, Allegra Moet Brantly, Factora’s founder and CEO, finishes the benediction with a bright smile and eager eyes. Looking around the Zoom room, it’s fascinating to consider what brought us all here, to a sort of financial confidence bootcamp for women. As Moet Brantly begins, I pull out my notebook and text my partner to bring me a bar of chocolate as the words “compound interest” in deep burgundy flicker onto the screen. It’s going to be a long night.
“It’s dangerous to find ourselves on auto-pilot,” cautioned Moet Brantly as slides in our third session demonstrated timeless financial principles, like paying yourself first and putting an end to trading time for money. The course also suggested repurposing mindless spending as investing, emphasizing increasing one’s investment rate instead of stressing over the small stuff.

Over the course of the class, I increased my own savings rate from a very auto-pilot-esque 10% to something closer to 30%. The trick for me? Labeling buckets in my high-yield savings account with short-to-mid-term goals. It turns out, when I can see my money’s redirection from Net-a-Porter to a house fund, it feels more satisfying.

Twice during each Wealth Circle, the group was split into random breakout rooms. Here, with little to no context beyond the rectangles on our screens, we shared real numbers, without shame. In one breakout session, we shared our net worths, numbers ranging from the negatives to upwards of a million. Then, we shared our net worth goals. I went first, apprehensive to speak a number higher than I’d ever imagined possible. I watched as the entire group smiled back, nodding, and then proceeded to each offer a number higher than my own. There was something coven-like and moving to feel a group of women encourage me to dream bigger.

But Factora’s not built on dreaming. It’s grounded in straightforward, if not simple, investing principles, like focusing on time in the market over timing the market. The conversation around assets highlighted just how personal things can get in the world of personal finance. As a 26-year-old in Brooklyn, owning property has always been a pipe dream, at best. A sound investment, to me, was a great pair of walking shoes and an unlimited subway card. Hearing women older than me, during breakout groups and as examples during lectures, inspired me to bring a level of creativity to accumulate assets. Sure, buying my apartment might not be my next step, but it was freeing to imagine what might be.

“Money creates opportunity. When you have more money, you’ll have more money and decision-making,” said Moet Brantly during our fourth session on real estate investments. Instead of investing in a home, I took the time to set aside an emergency fund with six months of living expenses. Was it a “sexy” investing move with massive payoff or worthy of bragging about at brunch? No, but it was a way of empowering myself toward decision-making from a place of security and stability.

The changes I’ve made thanks to Wealth Circle haven’t been drastic or dramatic. They’ve been small-scale shifts in the way I think about money, which is a tool toward greater freedom and more choice in the way I live my life.

By the last time we recited the benediction, I found myself believing the three sentences I spoke: “I am here. I am capable. I am wealthy.” Even though it was 8 PM in New York City, I was there. Thanks to my recent hiring of a CPA to sort out my freelancing taxes, I was capable. And because of my newfound confidence in investing, I was wealthy.

Disclosure: This post may highlight financial products and services that can help you make smarter decisions with your money. We do not give investment advice or encourage you to adopt a certain investment strategy. What you decide to do with your money is up to you. If you take action based on one of our recommendations, we get a small share of the revenue from our commerce partners. This does not influence whether we feature a financial product or service. We operate independently from our advertising sales team. Read our editorial standards.

Continue Reading

Money

Rueda Empire signs $3.7 million deal to further its music career

Three albums and 3.7 million dollars are the basis of the agreement signed in Los Angeles on May 4 to boost Rueda Empire’s musical career. Following the success of the urban artist’s second album, Inefable, this new contract ensures the production and distribution of the artist’s material for the next three years.

It was with great joy that the artist signed this agreement on the eve of the Mexican Heritage holiday, which was a very symbolic moment for him. He assures that doing so on this date is a good omen for his musical career.

Rueda Empire will release his next album this summer, in which he has been working for months in collaboration with Nahuel Lion, from the Canary Islands. On this album, the artists fuse Latin rhythms with urban music such as trap and reggaeton.

The interpreter of “Tú no sabes de eso”, “Quédate”, “Solo amigos”, “Cómo me curo”, among other songs, continues to reap success in his musical career and hopes to continue making his audience dance with good music, contagious rhythms and modern melodies.

To stay up to date with everything that happens in Rueda Empire’s career subscribe to his YouTube channel where he makes all his releases. You can also find him on Spotify and Instagram as @rueda_empire.

Continue Reading

Money

Opinion | Virginia uses tax money in wrong way to lure Washington Commanders stadium – The Washington Post

Localities in the D.C. area are jockeying to land the new stadium planned by the Washington Commanders. But there are a right way and a wrong way to deploy taxpayer dollars in pursuit of it. Maryland is going about it the right way. Virginia is not. The jury is out on the District of Columbia.

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan, a Republican, made clear that the state would offer no money to help billionaire Daniel Snyder build a stadium to replace Landover’s FedEx Field, which the Commanders plan to vacate in 2027. He got no pushback from lawmakers in Annapolis, who passed a bill authorizing up to $400 million in borrowing — not for a new stadium but to tear down FedEx Field and, more to the point, kick-start a shiny new development in the wasteland nearby. That would help avoid an economic body blow to the local economy should the Commanders leave, and help transform nearby Largo into a plausible downtown for the surrounding locality, Prince George’s County. It would get a $16 million amphitheater, civic plaza, public market, library and other amenities near Metro’s eastern terminus for the Blue and Silver lines.

That’s a smart way for Maryland to tell the Commanders: Hey, we’ll be happy if the team stays put — and we’re willing to upgrade the neighborhood — but we’re not in the business of building stadiums for billionaires who can afford it on their own. What’s more, another National Football League team, the Los Angeles Rams, just won a Super Bowl at SoFi Stadium, their home field, which owner Stan Kroenke built with $5 billion in private funds. If the Rams owner can make do without milking taxpayers, so can Mr. Snyder.

Unfortunately, that lesson seems lost on Virginia. Although no deal has been finalized by state lawmakers in Richmond, they seem prepared to kick in as much as $350 million in state tax revenue for a new stadium for the Commanders. That’s a good deal for Mr. Snyder but not for Virginians.

Granted, it’s much less than the $1 billion in taxes the state originally seemed willing to earmark for the team. Granted, too, Virginia is the most populous state in the nation without a big-league sports franchise; it might be suffering from a case of franchise envy as it gazes across its borders at North Carolina, Tennessee, Maryland and D.C., all of which have plenty. But that is no excuse for profligacy in service to a very rich man.

D.C., for its part, isn’t really in a position to compete for the moment — the federal government owns the only plausible location for a new arena, at the current site of RFK Stadium, and Congress doesn’t look ready to pass legislation to sell it to the city.
Congress’s reluctance is rooted at least partly in justified concerns about Mr. Snyder, the Commanders and the team’s culture, which have been the subject of investigations into sexual harassment and, most recently, financial impropriety over allegations that the team hid and withheld revenue-sharing funds from the NFL. Those probes should serve as a warning: Mr. Snyder and his team are not worthy of public money.

Editorials represent the views of The Washington Post as an institution, as determined through debate among members of the Editorial Board, based in the Opinions section and separate from the newsroom.

Members of the Editorial Board and areas of focus: Deputy Editorial Page Editor Karen Tumulty; Deputy Editorial Page Editor Ruth Marcus; Associate Editorial Page Editor Jo-Ann Armao (education, D.C. affairs); Jonathan Capehart (national politics); Lee Hockstader (immigration; issues affecting Virginia and Maryland); David E. Hoffman (global public health); Charles Lane (foreign affairs, national security, international economics); Heather Long (economics); Molly Roberts (technology and society); and Stephen Stromberg (elections, the White House, Congress, legal affairs, energy, the environment, health care).
Opinion
Opinion
Opinion

source

Continue Reading

Trending