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Extreme, Unexpected Kid Costs: How to Plan for the Unplanned

It would be impossible to list all the costs associated with raising children. As a parent, you’ll spend on a wide variety of goods and services, starting the day they’re born and lasting until you’re ready to stop.

A 2022 report from The Brookings Institution estimated the total average family expenditures on a child born in 2015 to a middle-class, two-child family in the United States to be $310,605.

You hopefully anticipate and can manage some costs like clothes and food. But other costs can be far more expensive – and come out of the blue. When they do, they can blow your carefully constructed budget out of the water.

The following scenarios might not occur in your family’s future but you never know. If they do, here’s what you need to consider – and how you can keep them from throwing your finances out of whack.

Academic Help
Your child has suddenly fallen behind in school and is now having trouble keeping up. When that happens, you may want to sign them up for summer school classes or tutoring.

“Planning for beyond-school support, whether to fill in gaps or enrichment, is a key element of academic planning,” Rebecca Mannis, Ph.D., learning specialist and founder of New York City-based Ivy Prep, says.

“Here, ‘less is more’ may not be realistic. Caveat emptor, as tutoring is largely an unlicensed field,“ she says.

After getting recommendations from friends and teachers, Mannis urges parents to spend time understanding a learning specialist’s approach and methods. According to Tutors.com, you can expect to pay somewhere between $25 and $80 an hour for the service, so you need to ensure it matches your child’s needs.

Before paying, though, find out if you can get help for free through the school’s individualized education plans. If it will be coming out of your own pocket and your child has diagnosed learning challenges, you may be able to deduct the costs from your taxes.

[ READ: Tax Write-Offs You Shouldn’t Overlook. ]
Sports and Talent
Your child is fascinated with football, figure skating or the flute – and paying for these activities wasn’t in your financial playbook.

It’s great to encourage extracurricular activities, but set clear boundaries. Coaches and instructors make many demands, so it’s important you to talk to your child about your personal parameters.

“Be realistic with your child and help them prioritize,” Mannis says. “Not only will t

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Innovation

Austin Housing Market Forecast

Given the enormous popularity of the greater Austin, Texas, area for online searches, newcomers and employment growth, it may act as a reasonable bellwether for the state of the U.S. housing market. This will certainly be tested in the spring and summer selling season, when the National Association of Realtors reports that about 40% of sales of existing homes throughout the U.S are historically made between the months of May and August. Besides offering warmer weather, buying a home during these months allows buyers with school-aged children to shop, bid, close and move into a new residence before the start of a new school year.

Similar to the overall U.S. housing market in mid-2020, the Austin housing market went into serious overdrive marked by a sharp decline in months of inventory, bidding wars and rising prices as sales jumped, fueled by buyers eager to take advantage of record-low mortgage rates. Flash forward to early 2023, and both the Austin and national housing markets are taking a bit of a breather, featuring more supply, falling prices and more careful buyers ensuring that making a deal in an environment of higher mortgage rates still makes financial sense.

However, for buyers of newly built homes, the current overhang of unsold inventory is unlikely to last, given how assertive some builders with in-house mortgage subsidiaries can be with incentives such as mortgage-rate buydowns as low as 4% to 5%, especially for those who can close quickly.

Using information from the U.S. News Housing Market Index, we’ve compiled the data you need for a better understanding of the current state of the market. Here’s what you should know a.

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Innovation

Leading Researcher on Health and Social Inequities, Seth Holmes, to speak at John Martinson Honors College

Medical anthropologist Seth Holmes, most notable for authoring the powerful and culturally impactful book Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies: Migrant Farmworkers in the United States, will visit the Purdue University campus for the sixth annual Aronson Family Science and Society Lecture.

Made possible by the generous donation of the Aronson family and hosted by the John Martinson Honors College in collaboration with the Institute for a Sustainable Future, and the Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Holmes will headline his campus visit on Thursday March 2 with a keynote lecture on migrant farmwork and its implications on health and food systems.

The keynote lecture will take place on March 2, 2023 in Honors College and Residences North in Honors Hall at 5:30 p.m.. Holmes’ lecture titled “How Social Inequity Comes to be Treated as Natural” will challenge the audience to consider the experiences of work, health and health care among indigenous Latin American migrant farmworkers in the United States. Holmes will present case studies that analyze the realities of migration and farm work where each intersect with health and social inequity. The lecture is free and open to the public. A reception will follow with light refreshments and an opportunity to meet and visit with Dr. Holmes.

Holmes will open his visit by meeting with graduate students and participation in a panel discussion on Wednesday March 1 at 3:30 p.m. with Purdue faculty from the John Martinson Honors College, Department of Public Health, Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, and the Department of Anthropology. The discussion will include thoughtful critique on the topic of race, place, and economics on issues of work, migration, environmental and public health. The panel discussion will be in the auditorium at Burton Morgan Center for Entrepreneurship. Light refreshments will follow the panel in the Burton Morgan Café.

Additional groups promoting the campus visit include the Department of Anthropology, the Latino Cultural Center, the Purdue chapter of the Multicultural Efforts to end Sexual Assault (MESA) program and the Purdue AgrAbility program.

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
Wednesday March 1
Panel Discussion
3:30 p.m. | Burton Morgan, Auditorium
Reception with Light Refreshments
4:30 p.m. | Burton Morgan Café

Thursday March 2
Keynote Lecture
5:30 p.m. | Honors College & Residences North, Honors Hall
Reception with Light Refreshments
6:30 p.m. | Honors College & Residences North, Innovation Forum

About Seth Homes, MD, Ph.D.
Dr. Holmes is currently a Chancellor’s Professor in Society and Environment and Medical Anthropology and affiliated faculty in Public Health at UC Berkeley. He is Founder of the Berkeley Center for Social Medicine and Co-Director of the MD/PhD Track in Medical Anthropology coordinated between UC Berkeley and UC San Francisco. A cultural and medical anthropologist and internal medicine physician, he has worked on social hierarchies, health inequities, and the ways in which such asymmetries are naturalized, normalized, and resisted in the contexts of transnational im/migration, agro-food systems, and health care.

About the Aronson Family Science and Society Lecture Series
The Aronson Family Science and Society Lecture is an annual series welcoming leading researchers and pioneers in the fields of science and social impact to our West Lafayette campus. Visiting scholars enjoy several days at Purdue interacting with faculty and students, participation in a panel discussion with Purdue faculty on topics of cultural impact with a final presentation to a large group of faculty, staff, students, and members of the general public. Previous speakers for the series have included Captain Scott Kelly, NASA astronaut and commander of the International Space Station, Moira Gunn, a former NASA scientist, Purdue alumna, and host of the NPR program “Tech Nation.”, and a West Lafayette native, Dr. Katie Bouman, who as a member of the Event Horizon Telescope team helped to capture the first image of a black hole.

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Innovation

Gunman Kills 3, Including Reporter Covering Initial Shooting

Florida police say a gunman accused of killing a woman in the Orlando area returned to the neighborhood hours later and shot four more people, killing a journalist covering the original shooting and a 9-year-old child.

A gunman accused of killing a woman in the Orlando area returned to the same neighborhood hours later and shot four more people, killing a journalist covering the original shooting and a 9-year-old child, Florida police said.

Spectrum News 13 identified the slain reporter Thursday as Dylan Lyons. Photographer Jesse Walden was also wounded.

The two were in an unmarked news vehicle on Wednesday afternoon covering the first homicide when a man approached and shot them, Orange County Sheriff John Mina said during a news conference. The man then went to a nearby home where he fatally shot T’yonna Major and critically wounded the child’s mother. Officials have not yet released the name of the girl’s mother.

The sheriff said police have detained Keith Melvin Moses, 19, who they believe is responsible for all of the shootings.

Mina said police didn’t immediately know the motive for the shootings. He said Moses was acquainted with Nathacha Augustin, 38, who was the first victim, but did not appear to have a connection with any of the others. He said it was not clear if Moses knew that two of the people shot were journalists and noted their vehicle didn’t look like a typical news van or have the station’s logo on it.

It was not immediately known whether Moses has a lawyer who can speak on his behalf.

“I want to acknowledge what a horrible day this has been for our community and our media partners,” Mina told a room full of reporters. “No one in our community — not a mother, not a 9-year-old and certainly not news professionals — should become the victim of gun violence in our community.”

The sheriff was meeting with community leaders on Thursday morning, and was expected to provide more details about the case after that meeting.

On Wednesday morning, deputies responded to the Pine Hills area, just northwest of Orlando, after reports that a woman in her 20s was shot.

Lyons and Walden were shot hours later while covering that shooting, followed by the mother and daughter, according to police and witnesses. WFTV crews, who were also reporting on the morning shooting, tried to give medical aid to the Spectrum 13 journalists.

Mina said Moses has already been charged with first-degree murder for the initial victim, and charges are expected soon for the other four victims. Moses’ criminal history includes gun charges, as well as aggravated battery, assault with a deadly weapon, burglary and grand theft offenses, the sheriff said.

Our hearts go out to the family of the journalist killed today and the crew member injured in Orange County, Florida, as well as the whole Spectrum News team,” White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said on Twitter.

“Please, please, say a prayer tonight for our co-worker who is in critical condition. And while you’re at it, please say a prayer for every victim of gun violence in this country,” Spectrum 13 journalist Celeste Springer said during her live on-air report Wednesday evening.

In a story published early Thursday, the station identified Lyons and Walden.

“(Lyons) took his job very seriously. He loved his career. He loved what he did,” said Spectrum Sports 360 reporter and friend, Josh Miller. “He loved the community, telling the stories of people, reporting on the news, and he was just passionate about what he did.”

Lyons was born and raised in Philadelphia, and graduated from the University of Central Florida, the station said. Before joining Spectrum News, he worked for a station in Gainesville.

Rachel Lyons, the reporter’s older sister, is raising money for his funeral in a GoFundMe account. She wrote that Lyons would have turned 25 in March. He is also survived by his parents and fiancée.

Worldwide, 40 journalists were reported killed last year, plus another two this year before Wednesday, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists. Only one of those was in the United States.

Jeff German, who covered politics and corruption for the Las Vegas Review-Journal, was found dead outside his home in September after being stabbed multiple times. Former Clark County Public Administrator Robert Telles, who had been a frequent subject of German’s reporting, has pleaded not guilty to a murder charge.

In 2015, Virginia reporter Alison Parker and cameraman Adam Ward were shot and killed during their live TV broadcast for CBS affiliate WDBJ7. The suspect, a former reporter for the TV station, died by suicide during the law enforcement search for him.

Frisaro reported from Fort Lauderdale, Fischer reported from Miami; Associated Press writer Stefanie Dazio in Los Angeles contributed to this report.

Copyright 2023 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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